Forever Is Now: Leaving Afghanistan

Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder, United States Air Forces Central/DVIDS  By Andrew C. Jarocki It’s increasingly popular and bipartisan to call for an end to “forever wars” like Afghanistan.  President Biden seems to have recognized this reality, writing on the campaign trail that “staying entrenched in unwinnable conflicts drains our capacity to lead on … Continue reading Forever Is Now: Leaving Afghanistan

Overcoming Myopic Militarism: A Case for Restraint

By Ethan Kessler Right now, America’s Middle East policy is significantly detached from the American national interest. An honest review of America’s interests in the Middle East reveals that they do not require today’s force posture. A bare-bones force posture and military restraint should fully substitute for the sweeping military presence currently in place.  America’s … Continue reading Overcoming Myopic Militarism: A Case for Restraint

Drawing Down: The Case for a Reduced But Reliable Middle Eastern Military Presence

By Alison O'Neil Oil on the Brain: Reconsidering the Carter Doctrine Middle Eastern affairs have dictated major aspects of American foreign policy for decades, catalyzing wars and covert action as well as some of the United States’ strongest alliances.  Throughout the history of American involvement, one policy objective has stood out from the others: the … Continue reading Drawing Down: The Case for a Reduced But Reliable Middle Eastern Military Presence

Nationalism Strikes Back in Eastern Europe

By Guzi He In 1989, momentous events prompted Eastern Europe to break free from the chains of soviet communism. Negotiations with civil society in Poland did away with one-party rule in April. Hungary followed suit five months later, commencing its own “Round Table Talks”. Then the Berlin Wall fell on November 9th. Germans on both … Continue reading Nationalism Strikes Back in Eastern Europe

Essay Contest IV – Are the United States and China on a path to conflict? Probably Not, but Bad Wars Start as Bad Ideas

Image by David Saveliev   Essay by Timothy Yin In his investigation into the causes of World War I, historian Christopher Clark cautions readers to distinguish between the objective factors acting on decision-makers and the “stories they told themselves” about their choices and rationales. Objectively, military conflict between the United States and China appears to … Continue reading Essay Contest IV – Are the United States and China on a path to conflict? Probably Not, but Bad Wars Start as Bad Ideas

Essay Contest III – Forget about the Thucydides Trap: War between America and China is Extremely Unlikely

Image by David Saveliev   Essay by Jenny W. Xiao “It was the rise of Athens and the fear that this inspired in Sparta that made war inevitable,” Thucydides wrote of the Peloponnesian War. The term “Thucydides Trap” was popularized by the Harvard academic Graham Allison and captures the tensions between a rising and an … Continue reading Essay Contest III – Forget about the Thucydides Trap: War between America and China is Extremely Unlikely

Essay Contest II – The Peaceable Pacific: Why Sino-American Conflict is not Inevitable

  Image by David Saveliev   Essay by Sam Seitz The world has changed. Following two interminable wars in the Middle East and Central Asia as well as a devastating financial crisis, the United States no longer enjoys the same degree of power and authority it once wielded. America’s image has been further tarnished by … Continue reading Essay Contest II – The Peaceable Pacific: Why Sino-American Conflict is not Inevitable

Essay Contest I – Hierarchy Is What States Make of It

Image by David Saveliev   Essay by Ken Lohatepanont World order, argues many scholars of international relations, is characterized by its very disorder — an anarchic situation where states exist in a Hobbbesian state of nature. “The strong do what they can”, said Thucydides, “and the weak suffer what they must”. It follows that when … Continue reading Essay Contest I – Hierarchy Is What States Make of It

What Medieval East Africa Can Teach Us About Realism

Old Dobgola Kingdom of Makuria, Throne hall. Author: Hans Nilsen   By: Matthew Petti In 625 AD, two armies met along the Nile. Muslim warriors led by Abdullah ibn Saad ibn Abi-Sarh marched south from Egypt towards Dongola, the capital of the Christian kingdom of Makuria, which ruled over Nubia in modern-day Sudan. But the … Continue reading What Medieval East Africa Can Teach Us About Realism