Is Salt Driving Russia’s Conquest of Bakhmut?

Grant W. Turner // In an expansionist empire that operates on corrupt networks of patronage, where internal stability and military power rely increasingly on domestic resources, acquiring a supply of salt closer to Russia’s industrial heart is undeniably in the interests of Putin’s regime and those who keep him in power. 

Zelensky’s Visit, “Kossuth Mania,” and America’s Altered Foreign Policy Debate

Lajos Kossuth on Broadway. New York Public Library Digital Collection. Public domain. Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky’s speech to Congress Wednesday night saw the leader receive a standing ovation roughly once every ninety seconds. The enthusiasm brought to mind a similar episode 171 years ago: a visit by Hungarian revolutionary Lajos Kossuth. Kossuth had led Hungary … Continue reading Zelensky’s Visit, “Kossuth Mania,” and America’s Altered Foreign Policy Debate

The Russian Withdrawal of Kherson: Liberation or Trap?

Grant W. Turner // What explains the Russian evacuation from Kherson? One possibility: Russian soldiers are waiting in Kherson City and elsewhere in the pocket pretending to be the now largely evacuated civilians so that when the Ukrainians approach, there appears to be widespread civilian resistance in favor of Russian annexation.

The United States’ Counter-Productive Foreign Policy in Ukraine

By Johnny B. Davis // The United States needs a strategic reevaluation of its Russia policy. Russia is wrong to engage in war aggression against Ukraine. Still, the United States and Russia’s interests do not conflict. Ukraine is an issue between the European Union and Russia.

Party Like It’s 1979: Comparing Ukraine and the Last Soviet Invasion

By Brad Settelmeyer & Alison O'Neil // Ukraine’s current conflict is heading the same way as the Afghan war: away from the hallmarks of a “conventional” conflict and towards a protracted insurgency promising high costs for both sides.