Blessed Are the Dealmakers?

Image: CNS photo/Paul Haring By Andrew Jarocki “Blessed are the peacemakers,for they will be called children of God.”– Matthew 5:9 “The Pope?” scoffed Stalin, “And how many divisions does he have?”  It is tempting to dismiss the Vatican, a tiny city state entirely reliant on moral suasion, as irrelevant in this era of renewed great … Continue reading Blessed Are the Dealmakers?

Foreign Policy at the RNC: Crisis and Contradiction

Image: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters By Solomon Bennett The foreign policy priorities outlined during the RNC reflect a foreign policy of contradictions. The tendencies of President Trump and the Republican Party—distain for federal government, friendliness with powerful moneyed interests, and policies of austerity and privatization—are increasingly incongruent with national priorities both domestically and internationally. In 2016, President … Continue reading Foreign Policy at the RNC: Crisis and Contradiction

A Crossroads of Vision at the DNC

Joe Biden delivers his nomination acceptance speech at the socially distanced Democratic National Convention August 20, 2020 (NBC News) By Solomon Bennett The 2020 Democratic National Convention and the release of the 2020 Democratic Party Platform signify a number of critical steps that the United States can take to repair the damage wrought by the … Continue reading A Crossroads of Vision at the DNC

Realism and Conservatism: The Elephant(s) in the Room

By Ethan Kessler Today, as the world continues to suffer from continued anthropogenic degradation, as mankind enters its fifth month of the coronavirus pandemic, and as America’s cities burn and rend at the seams on a scale not seen in generations, questions of international relations theory may seem too abstract to ponder. Nevertheless some have … Continue reading Realism and Conservatism: The Elephant(s) in the Room

The Korean War and the Need for Atonement

Image: Natalie Wu By Scott Strgacich The Korean War of 1950 to 1953 was modern America’s first public opinion war. For the first time, Gallup, Incorporated conducted polling that actually fluctuated with the course of the conflict. Five years earlier, the initial loss of Pacific holdings to the Japanese, the ineffectiveness of the Allied strategic … Continue reading The Korean War and the Need for Atonement

Too Much Bang for our Buck: How excessive defense spending hurts American interests

By Andrew Doris "Balancing the Military Budget" by David Saveliev President Trump recently scolded American allies for not funding their fair share of the NATO defense compact.  He had a point: while the U.S. spends 3.6% of its GDP on its military, nations like France and Germany only spend 1.8% and 1.2%, respectively.  For decades … Continue reading Too Much Bang for our Buck: How excessive defense spending hurts American interests

Yemen’s Nightmare: A Time to Refrain from Embracing

Image: Natalie Wu By: Scott Strgacich Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman strikes an interesting figure. To some, he represents the vanguard of Saudi liberalization and modernization. To others, an ambitious scion of a blood-stained dynasty with a Cheshire cat grin and a hawkish bent. To still others, he is an utter enigma. Of … Continue reading Yemen’s Nightmare: A Time to Refrain from Embracing

Violating the Iran Nuclear Deal: Reducing American Leverage

By Keith Blankfield Graffiti on the wall of the closed US embassy in Tehran.  © David Holt On May 8, 2018, US President Donald Trump announced his decision to impose new sanctions on Iran, thus violating the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and jeopardizing the 2015 nuclear nonproliferation agreement between Iran and the West. Like … Continue reading Violating the Iran Nuclear Deal: Reducing American Leverage

Why is Congress Losing Foreign Policymaking Power?

by Luke Grabowski Following in the footsteps of his many predecessors, President Donald Trump launched an unconstitutional missile strike in Syria – a declaration of war without congressional consultation or approval. The response to such transgressions prompted Garrett Epps of The Atlantic to remark on “the need to keep turning the conversation back to constitutional … Continue reading Why is Congress Losing Foreign Policymaking Power?

Why the Shia-Sunni Divide Doesn’t Matter As Much As You Think It Does

By Matthew Petti The mainstream American view of politics in the Muslim world, and particularly the Middle East, is driven by sectarian identity politics. Persians are Shi'ite, the conventional wisdom goes, and most Arabs are Sunni, so the two factions have coalesced around Iran and Saudi Arabia in the continuation of an age-old struggle for … Continue reading Why the Shia-Sunni Divide Doesn’t Matter As Much As You Think It Does