One Belt One Road—China’s Bid for Eurasia

by Jan Gerber Napoleon Bonaparte once warned that when China wakes from its slumber, it will shake the world. This particular line of one of the great geostrategic minds of history has gained new eminence over the past few years. China is awake, and after decades of slow, surreptitious rise, it is now shaking Eurasia … Continue reading One Belt One Road—China’s Bid for Eurasia

Democracy and Corruption in Brazil

By Ian Elliott Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2007, copyright World Economic Forum The year is 2010. Jim O’Neill, then chairman of Goldman Sacs, has just claimed that President Lula da Silva is the “most successful G20 policy maker of the last decade.” Brazil has recently hosted a … Continue reading Democracy and Corruption in Brazil

Kirkuk: Inside an Iraqi Battlefield

By Matthew Petti Ethnicity is a big deal in Kirkuk. Since the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, and the recognition of Kurdish autonomy in the 2005 constitution, both internal and external factions have fought for the right to call the oil-rich, multicultural city their own. Many of these factions, including the Kurdistan Regional Government … Continue reading Kirkuk: Inside an Iraqi Battlefield

Violating the Iran Nuclear Deal: Reducing American Leverage

By Keith Blankfield Graffiti on the wall of the closed US embassy in Tehran.  © David Holt On May 8, 2018, US President Donald Trump announced his decision to impose new sanctions on Iran, thus violating the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and jeopardizing the 2015 nuclear nonproliferation agreement between Iran and the West. Like … Continue reading Violating the Iran Nuclear Deal: Reducing American Leverage

Why is Congress Losing Foreign Policymaking Power?

by Luke Grabowski Following in the footsteps of his many predecessors, President Donald Trump launched an unconstitutional missile strike in Syria – a declaration of war without congressional consultation or approval. The response to such transgressions prompted Garrett Epps of The Atlantic to remark on “the need to keep turning the conversation back to constitutional … Continue reading Why is Congress Losing Foreign Policymaking Power?

Remembering Rwanda: How Rwanda Instituted Post-Genocide Reconciliation

By Caroline Caywood With the arrival of spring comes a season of change and renewal for the world and its populations. But with this transitional period also comes the anniversary of one of the greatest humanitarian crises of the 20th century. April 7 has been set aside as a day of memorial for the Rwandan … Continue reading Remembering Rwanda: How Rwanda Instituted Post-Genocide Reconciliation

The President’s Attack on Syria Was Plainly Unconstitutional.  Here’s Why That Matters.

By Andrew Doris Burnt Syrian government's tanks in Azaz, Syria by Christiaan Triebert In the face of military conflict, realists tend not to concern themselves with abstraction.  Constitutions are just pieces of paper with rules on them and, unfortunately, states competing for power on the global arena rarely allow those rules to constrain their actions.  Trump … Continue reading The President’s Attack on Syria Was Plainly Unconstitutional.  Here’s Why That Matters.

Here’s a List of All the Constitutional Clauses Authorizing the President’s Airstrikes on Syria

By Andrew Doris                                                                                                         … Continue reading Here’s a List of All the Constitutional Clauses Authorizing the President’s Airstrikes on Syria

Why the Shia-Sunni Divide Doesn’t Matter As Much As You Think It Does

By Matthew Petti The mainstream American view of politics in the Muslim world, and particularly the Middle East, is driven by sectarian identity politics. Persians are Shi'ite, the conventional wisdom goes, and most Arabs are Sunni, so the two factions have coalesced around Iran and Saudi Arabia in the continuation of an age-old struggle for … Continue reading Why the Shia-Sunni Divide Doesn’t Matter As Much As You Think It Does

The Problem with Trump’s Tariffs

By Austin Rose On Friday, January 26, President Donald Trump stood before a packed crowd of global elites at the famously ritzy World Economic Forum in Davos and proclaimed that “the United States will no longer turn a blind eye to unfair economic practices including… industrial subsidies and pervasive state-led economic planning.” Ironically, that very … Continue reading The Problem with Trump’s Tariffs